Day 1: Initialization and WCAG Introduction

And here I go! To start off my journey to earn my Web Accessibility Specialist certification, I had to get myself in gear, get organized, and just start.

Things I accomplished

  • Launched this WordPress blog to make myself accountable to commit daily to web a11y study.
  • Set up a Google Calendar to keep myself on track to complete 80% of study materials by March 10, 2019, and beyond to April 3rd, when my exam happens (see my “How to Succeed” widget.
  • Read through WCAG 2.1 introduction non-normative).

What I learned today

Pyramid with 4 Principles as the foundation, 13 Guidelines, Success Criteria, and, lastly, Techniques.

  • WCAG layers of guidance include:
  • WCAG 2.1 updated 2.0 to be more inclusive of:
    • users with cognitive or learning disabilities,
    • users with low vision, and
    • users with disabilities on mobile devices
  • 17 new success criteria were appended to WCAG 2.0:
    • 1.3.4 Orientation (AA)
    • 1.3.5 Identify Input Purpose (AA)
    • 1.3.6 Identify Purpose (AAA)
    • 1.4.10 Reflow (AA)
    • 1.4.11 Non-Text Contrast (AA)
    • 1.4.12 Text Spacing (AA)
    • 1.4.13 Content on Hover or Focus (AA)
    • 2.1.4 Character Key Shortcuts (A)
    • 2.2.6 Timeouts (AAA)
    • 2.3.3 Animation from Interactions (AAA)
    • 2.5.1 Pointer Gestures (A)
    • 2.5.2 Pointer Cancellation (A)
    • 2.5.3 Label in Name (A)
    • 2.5.4 Motion Actuation (A)
    • 2.5.5 Target Size (AAA)
    • 2.5.6 Concurrent Input Mechanisms (AAA)
    • 4.1.3 Status Messages (AA)
  • An overhaul of WCAG is coming in a few year. In the meantime, 2.1 is the current recommendation, and 2.2 will be recommended shortly after that, before the new changes happens.

Journey to Learn All Things Web Accessibility Begins

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”
Dr. Seuss, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut!

Thanks for coming! I’m here to learn web accessibility at a greater depth, so that I can become a Web Accessibility Specialist. In 100 days I plan to be (mostly) prepared for IAAP’s Web Accessibility Specialist certification exam. Along the way, I’d like to share with you what I learn each day.

Join me on my journey to learn about all things web accessibility from W3C documentation to user stories.